Category Archives: News

Its like rejuvenation

I couldn’t resist the temptation to blatantly quote Howard Stern whack packer Blue Iris, as the phrase describes my recent adventures in web design perfectly. It had been way too long; way too long since I’d put myself back in student mode, way too long since I’d let HTML 5 and CSS 3 take shape without paying too much attention, and way too long since I’d posted here. So without further ado, lets take a look at what’s happened in web design over the past six months:

  1. Zeldman released Designing with Web Standards, 3rd Edition.
  2. HTML 5 and CSS 3 support gain traction.
  3. WordPress 3 set to drop any day now.
  4. The BIG Web Show launched.
  5. jQuery still rocks.

Lets take them one at a time:

1. Zeldman has released Designing with Web Standards, 3rd Edition.

The king is back. And this time he’s got a sidekick. That’s right, Jeffrey Zeldman released the 3rd edition of the book that changed the web industry, and he signed up Ethan Marcotte as his trusty co-author this time around. I just blazed through the book in a week, and I’m gearing up for a second run-through. Needless to say, not only will this book give you a rock-solid foundation for building modern web sites, its been updated with current technologies in mind, including new kids on the block, HTML 5 and CSS 3. Also, a special treat this time around is a companion volume, Developing with Web Standards, released simultaneously. Author John Alsopp picks up where Zeldman leaves off, providing the practical solutions to Zeldman’s powerful theory. I’m giving myself a bit of time to digest Designing with Web Standards prior to diving into Developing, but look for a full review of Designing to come over the next few weeks here at Withinsight. All I can say for now is, bravo.

2. HTML 5 and CSS 3 support gaining traction.

HTML 5 and CSS 3 not only offer all kinds of fun new goodies for web designers and developers alike, they’re now starting to gain real support. In addition to the support already provided for new HTML elements and CSS properties in browsers where you’d expect it like Firefox, Chrome and Safari, it appears that IE9 has completely jumped on the bleeding-edge standards wagon. While the finalized specs are still years off, if all major browsers support them with the release of the next version of IE, we’ll be able to start using them reliably very soon. Actually, you already can, but more on that in bullet 4. If IE9 really does support HTML 5 and CSS 3 as well or better than other modern browsers, this may just be the kick that IT departments and large corporations need to drop their “IE6 fo’ life” mantra. Exciting times indeed.

3. WordPress 3 is set to drop any day now.

WordPress 3 will support multi-site installations, meaning you can install WordPress once and create multiple blogs from the single installation. I’m so happy I think I just made a mess in my pants. This means no more upgrading multiple installations of WordPress with each release, centralized plugin management, and huge swaths of citizens rejoicing in the streets for weeks on end. Well, maybe not that last part, but this one feature alone would be enough for me for one upgrade. I’ve played with the beta 2 release a bit, and its super-simple to setup multiple blogs, and basically acts like WPMU did, where you can select subdomains or subdirectories for all your additional blogs. The potential is making me dizzy. Roo-haa.

4. The BIG Web Show launched.

Zeldman’s The BIG Web Show launched recently, and just concluded its third episode this past Thursday. If you like web design, pay attention. Episode 2 featured Jeremy Keith as a special guest, promoting his latest book, HTML 5 for Web Designers, which is slated to drop in June. Remember when I mentioned using HTML 5 and CSS 3 now above? Good! In The BIG Web Show, episode 2, Keith explains how you can start supporting the semantics of HTML 5 now by using standard class names for your divs that correspond to the HTML 5 elements. Not only does it make transitioning in a future redesign easier, it makes explaining your classes to other designers or developers 100 times easier when you hand off your work because you can just point them to the spec. Fantastic. Also, kind of a sub-bullet here, HTML 5 for Web Designers is the first book from A Book Apart publishing! I’m overjoyed with this new publishing company and will likely gobble up each and every offering they proffer from here until infinity.

5. jQuery still rocks.

I really only started working with jQuery personally about a year ago, and since then the library has really gone full-blown as the hands-down most popular JavaScript library in existence. Not only has it been included in the download of WordPress for a while now, its hosted by Google in its compressed form, which means if you link to the Google version and your site visitors already visited a site that also links to the Google version of jQuery, they don’t have to download it again. In addition, all the JavaScript examples in Designing with Web Standards, 3rd Edition are in jQuery, because it just makes JavaScript so much more concise and is easy for the uninitiated to pick up, having a syntax very similar to CSS selectors.

So that’s it for now, stay tuned for more frequent updates as I’m completely turned on by the impending release of WordPress 3 and impending web standards developments. This truly is an exciting time to be a web developer. Cheers!

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How Fluid.app will Change the World

Are you the type of web surfer who has tons of tabs open all the time? Do you get frustrated when one web page causes all your other tabs to crash, or even just slows your productivity when you install a plugin and have to restart your browser?

How many of the tabs that you typically keep open all day are web apps? How many of them do you frequently revisit or refresh, constantly checking their status?

If you can identify with any of the questions above (and you have a Mac), get ready to experience a revolution. Fluid.app allows you to insert any web app URL, give it a title and icon, and voila, you’ve got an application (or SSB: Site Specific Browser) running like an application in OS X.

You can dock all your new web apps (I’ve got Yahoo Mail, Finance, Basecamp, Facebook and Google Reader setup here):

web-apps

You can also convert your SSB into a MenuExtra SSB, which exists only as an icon in your OS X Status Bar:

stats-bar

Fluid.app is based on Safari’s Webkit rendering engine, and all the SSB’s you create are true Cocoa OS X applications.

Once the coolness factor wears off, you may start to realize what this all means.  People have been talking for years about how once web apps get to the point where they’re as robust as desktop apps, we’d see a major paradigm shift in the way people use computers.  With this single application, you are now able to convert any web app you use into a desktop app.

While web apps still have a ways to go before they truly offer the same functionality as desktop apps, this is the first major move in that direction.

Grab Fluid.app today.  Its changed the way I use my Mac in less than 24 hours since I got it.